"Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader", 2014  Published by Lawrence Gipe at the University of Arizona, with funds from a Confluence Center Faculty Innovation Grant.  50 pages, paperback, Edition of 500    
  
 
  
    
  
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  In 2014, I received a University of Arizona Confluence Center Grant for “Documenting Operation Streamline,” an on-going drawing project recording the plight of illegal immigrants on their journey through the Arizona court system via the controversial “Operation Streamline” process. With funds from the grant, I published  Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader  (2014-15), which combined sketches from Federal Court with press clippings and original research from UA journalist students (this book was a small edition, and was given away during lectures and events.) 
       
     
       
     
Screen Shot 2017-04-14 at 10.14.06 PM.png
       
     
   
  
 
  
    
  
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  "Waiting", 2016  graphite on paper  In 2005, the US Department of Homeland Security initiated “Operation Streamline,” as a way to increase “efficiency” with respect to deportation. The program immediately came under fire for being cruel and potentially un-Constitutional; as the site Grassroots Leadership describes it: “Operation Streamline has exposed undocumented border-crossers to unprecedented rates of incarceration; overburdened the federal criminal justice system; and added enormous costs to the American taxpayer while providing a boon to the for-profit private prison industry.”
       
     
 "Sentencing", 2013  graphite on paper  In 2012, a UA journalism student named Sam McNeil was writing an article about “Operation Streamline” for the activist blog truthout.org. Photography is prohibited in federal court, so he couldn’t supply imagery to accompany his exposé. McNeil asked me to illustrate the topic with drawings made in court, and to appear in a video called “Illustrating Operation Streamline”, which he was producing as his graduate thesis project. 
       
     
 "Portrait of Marcella", 2014  graphite on paper  After attending over 50 Streamline proceedings, I had a variety of sketches dealing with every visible aspect of the process - the deportees in the docks, the lawyers, judges and border patrol agents. 
       
     
 "U.S. Marshal", 2013  graphite on paper  The original sketches are in the University of Arizona’s Special Collections Library as part of “The Documented Border: A Digital Archive,” an interactive Digital Humanities project dedicated to generating and housing verbal, written and visual material about all aspects of the border, with an emphasis on controversial or “hidden” issues that need exposure and re-consideration. 
       
     
 "Caught in Douglas", 2013  graphite on paper  Sketching in Streamline court allowed me to create expressive drawings while addressing a political reality that impressed me as unjust and authoritarian. Although there is word of future legislation to eliminate for-profit, private prisons, there are thousands of deportees enduring long and punitive sentences in these facilities (many are centered 100 miles north of Tucson in Florence, AZ). 
       
     
 "Pleading Guilty", 2014  graphite on paper
       
     
 "Shackled", 2013  graphite on paper
       
     
 "Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader", 2014  Published by Lawrence Gipe at the University of Arizona, with funds from a Confluence Center Faculty Innovation Grant.  50 pages, paperback, Edition of 500    
  
 
  
    
  
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  In 2014, I received a University of Arizona Confluence Center Grant for “Documenting Operation Streamline,” an on-going drawing project recording the plight of illegal immigrants on their journey through the Arizona court system via the controversial “Operation Streamline” process. With funds from the grant, I published  Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader  (2014-15), which combined sketches from Federal Court with press clippings and original research from UA journalist students (this book was a small edition, and was given away during lectures and events.) 
       
     

"Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader", 2014

Published by Lawrence Gipe at the University of Arizona, with funds from a Confluence Center Faculty Innovation Grant.

50 pages, paperback, Edition of 500

In 2014, I received a University of Arizona Confluence Center Grant for “Documenting Operation Streamline,” an on-going drawing project recording the plight of illegal immigrants on their journey through the Arizona court system via the controversial “Operation Streamline” process. With funds from the grant, I published Operation Streamline: An Illustrated Reader (2014-15), which combined sketches from Federal Court with press clippings and original research from UA journalist students (this book was a small edition, and was given away during lectures and events.) 

       
     
Illustrating Operation Streamline

Created by Josh Morgan in 2014, "Illustrating Operation Streamline" is a short documentary using my Streamline sketches.

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  "Waiting", 2016  graphite on paper  In 2005, the US Department of Homeland Security initiated “Operation Streamline,” as a way to increase “efficiency” with respect to deportation. The program immediately came under fire for being cruel and potentially un-Constitutional; as the site Grassroots Leadership describes it: “Operation Streamline has exposed undocumented border-crossers to unprecedented rates of incarceration; overburdened the federal criminal justice system; and added enormous costs to the American taxpayer while providing a boon to the for-profit private prison industry.”
       
     

"Waiting", 2016

graphite on paper

In 2005, the US Department of Homeland Security initiated “Operation Streamline,” as a way to increase “efficiency” with respect to deportation. The program immediately came under fire for being cruel and potentially un-Constitutional; as the site Grassroots Leadership describes it: “Operation Streamline has exposed undocumented border-crossers to unprecedented rates of incarceration; overburdened the federal criminal justice system; and added enormous costs to the American taxpayer while providing a boon to the for-profit private prison industry.”

 "Sentencing", 2013  graphite on paper  In 2012, a UA journalism student named Sam McNeil was writing an article about “Operation Streamline” for the activist blog truthout.org. Photography is prohibited in federal court, so he couldn’t supply imagery to accompany his exposé. McNeil asked me to illustrate the topic with drawings made in court, and to appear in a video called “Illustrating Operation Streamline”, which he was producing as his graduate thesis project. 
       
     

"Sentencing", 2013

graphite on paper

In 2012, a UA journalism student named Sam McNeil was writing an article about “Operation Streamline” for the activist blog truthout.org. Photography is prohibited in federal court, so he couldn’t supply imagery to accompany his exposé. McNeil asked me to illustrate the topic with drawings made in court, and to appear in a video called “Illustrating Operation Streamline”, which he was producing as his graduate thesis project. 

 "Portrait of Marcella", 2014  graphite on paper  After attending over 50 Streamline proceedings, I had a variety of sketches dealing with every visible aspect of the process - the deportees in the docks, the lawyers, judges and border patrol agents. 
       
     

"Portrait of Marcella", 2014

graphite on paper

After attending over 50 Streamline proceedings, I had a variety of sketches dealing with every visible aspect of the process - the deportees in the docks, the lawyers, judges and border patrol agents. 

 "U.S. Marshal", 2013  graphite on paper  The original sketches are in the University of Arizona’s Special Collections Library as part of “The Documented Border: A Digital Archive,” an interactive Digital Humanities project dedicated to generating and housing verbal, written and visual material about all aspects of the border, with an emphasis on controversial or “hidden” issues that need exposure and re-consideration. 
       
     

"U.S. Marshal", 2013

graphite on paper

The original sketches are in the University of Arizona’s Special Collections Library as part of “The Documented Border: A Digital Archive,” an interactive Digital Humanities project dedicated to generating and housing verbal, written and visual material about all aspects of the border, with an emphasis on controversial or “hidden” issues that need exposure and re-consideration. 

 "Caught in Douglas", 2013  graphite on paper  Sketching in Streamline court allowed me to create expressive drawings while addressing a political reality that impressed me as unjust and authoritarian. Although there is word of future legislation to eliminate for-profit, private prisons, there are thousands of deportees enduring long and punitive sentences in these facilities (many are centered 100 miles north of Tucson in Florence, AZ). 
       
     

"Caught in Douglas", 2013

graphite on paper

Sketching in Streamline court allowed me to create expressive drawings while addressing a political reality that impressed me as unjust and authoritarian. Although there is word of future legislation to eliminate for-profit, private prisons, there are thousands of deportees enduring long and punitive sentences in these facilities (many are centered 100 miles north of Tucson in Florence, AZ). 

 "Pleading Guilty", 2014  graphite on paper
       
     

"Pleading Guilty", 2014

graphite on paper

 "Shackled", 2013  graphite on paper
       
     

"Shackled", 2013

graphite on paper